Archive for the ‘WiiWare’ Category

WiiWare Wednesday! Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth – Hours spent in Transylvania?

March 14, 2013

Coffee Beans
Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth released for Nintendo’s WiiWare service on December 28, 2009 in the U.S., at 1,000 Wii Points (which is $10). The game was developed by M2 and published by Konami, and received an ESRB rating of “TEEN” with “Animated Blood, Fantasy Violence” listed as content for parents and gamers to be aware of.

A brief description for the game on its Nintendo Channel page reads, “The classic Castlevania game is reborn for the Wii with all-new upgrades.”

How many U.S. Wii owners have reported playing Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth, and how many hours have they reported playing it? Brew yourself some coffee, and let’s take a look!

The Brew
Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth has approximately 16,044 U.S. Wii owners with gameplay data that has been reported through the Nintendo Channel. The game has just over 60,000 hours of gameplay reported, as the image shows, with 1,169 days possibly reported.

The average reported play-time is 3 hours 50 minutes “Per person”, which averages to be about 44 minutes played per day/session.

The game has a “professional” critic review score average of 81.40%, based on 20 reviews on GameRankings.com. It has a customer review score, or “User Score”, on MetaCritic.com of 9.3 out of 10, based on 31 ratings.

Based on the approximate number of players with reported data and the game’s $10 price point, Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth’s U.S. WiiWare release has made Konami about $160,440, since it released.

Caffeinated Thoughts
I played either the original Castlevania or Super Castlevania IV at a cousin’s house when I was younger, but not since then. I don’t remember which game it was, but I do remember using the whip in the game, and I thought it was really cool at the time.

If you haven’t seen footage for Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth, the short video below will give you an idea of the visual style for the game and some of the gameplay mechanics as well:

While Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth has a lower reported average played “Per person” than some other WiiWare games I have reported on before, I think it’s interesting that Konami allowed M2 to remake the game for the WiiWare service.

Why? Well, Konami had already released the original Castlevania through the Wii’s Virtual Console service in 2007, and had a few other Castlevania games on the Virtual Console service as well. Apparently though, Nintendo fans are Castlevania fans, and Konami probably saw some early sales numbers from the Virtual Console Castlevania titles and thought a remake would do well on the WiiWare service.

If you own a Wii or Wii U, and are interested in Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth you can still purchase it through the Wii’s Shop Channel under the WiiWare section. You can also find the original NES Castlevania and Castlevania II Simon’s Quest games, and the SNES Super Castlevania IV, on the Virtual Console section of the Wii’s Shop Channel.

Questions
First, if you’re a fan of the Castlevania games, do you have a favorite?

If you have played Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth, what did you think about the game? Was it a solid enough remake of the original, and worth its asking price?

Also, while I may not own a Nintendo 3DS, I am aware of the new Castlevania game that released for it earlier this month, Lords of Shadow Mirror of Fate. If you have played it, what do you think about it?

You can see a few Castlevania games below:

WiiWare Wednesday! Mega Man 9 – How many hours have U.S. Wii owners reported playing?

March 6, 2013


Coffee Beans
Mega Man 9 was released for Nintendo’s WiiWare service on September 22, 2008, in the U.S., at a $10 price point. The game was co-developed by Inti Creates and Capcom, with Capcom publishing it. It received an ESRB rating of “EVERYONE” with only “Mild Cartoon Violence” listed as content for parents and gamers to be aware of.

How many U.S. Wii owners have reported playing Mega Man 9 since it released, and how many hours have they reported playing it with 1,624 days of data possibly reported? Brew yourself some coffee, and let’s take a look!

Data shown is for U.S. Wii owners, not world-wide.

The Brew
Mega Man 9 has approximately 68,115 U.S. Wii owners that have gameplay data reported through the Nintendo Channel, and the average play-time per day/session is just over 50 Minutes.

As the image above shows, Mega Man 9 has almost 700,000 Total Hours of gameplay reported, which makes it the most played Mega Man game on the Wii, based on the Total Hours reported.

Like all other WiiWare titles, customer reviews are not available for the game directly on the console, but the game does have an 8.1 out of 10 “User Score”, based on 45 ratings on Metacritic.com. The WiiWare version of Mega Man 9 has a “professional” critic review score average of 84.04%, based on 28 reviews on GameRankings.com.

The U.S. WiiWare release of Mega Man 9 has made Capcom about $681,150 (before taxes and profit sharing) over the last 4 years, just based on the number of players that have data reported and the game’s $10 price point.

Caffeinated Thoughts
I mentioned in 2010 that I had never played any Mega Man game for any length of time. Now that we are 2013, that unfortunately still has not changed.

If you are not familiar with Mega Man 9, it is categorized as an “Action, Platformer”, and below you can see a video Capcom used to help promote the game back in 2008:

Being that I really enjoy platforming games, I don’t know why (other than my cheapness) that I don’t own any of the Mega Man games. Hopefully, Nintendo gets the Wii U’s Virtual Console and eShop issue straightened out quickly. Perhaps after they figure it out, I will look at purchasing a Mega Man game and be able to play it on just the Wii U GamePad, as I have come to enjoy that feature for several Wii U games already.

I would buy it for 30 cents, IF that were to somehow magically happen.

Questions
If you have played Mega Man 9, do you know how many hours you played the game? Also, if you’re a fan of the series, do you hope Capcom continues the Mega Man series; perhaps with a retro-styled Mega Man 11, or maybe with a totally different styled Mega Man game?

You can see Mega Man related products and games to buy from Amazon.com linked below!

WiiWare Wednesday! A cut above the rest? Bonsai Barber Data Report

September 5, 2012


Coffee Beans
Bonsai Barber was released for the Wii’s WiiWare service on March 30, 2009 in North America, at a price point of 1,000 Wii Points, which is $10. The game was developed by Zoonami and published by Nintendo, and received and ESRB rating of “Everyone” with “Comic Mischief” listed as content for gamers and parents to be aware of.

Do the reported hours for the game show it to be “a cut above the rest” of other WiiWare games? How many hours can you expect to get from Bonsai Barber if you have never played it? Brew yourself a fresh pot of coffee, and let’s take a look!

The Brew
Bonsai Barber has 69,584 “Total Hours” of game-play reported, from approximately 5,586 U.S. Wii owners that have used the Nintendo Channel with 1,253 days possibly reported. The game has an average play-time per day/session of about 34 Minutes, with its overall reported average play-time being 12 Hours 27 Minutes “Per person” as the image above shows.

What about the “professional” critic review scores for the game? Bonsai Barber has a review score average of 76.25%, based on 8 reviews on GameRankings.com. Its MetaCritic review score average is just slightly lower, being a 75 out of 100 based on 11 critic reviews.

Bonsai Barber’s U.S. release has made about $55,860 since it released, just based on the number of players that have reported data and the game’s $10 price point.

Caffeinated Thoughts
I remember seeing a trailer for Bonsai Barber when it was releasing, and thinking that it looked like an original idea, but an odd one. It reminded me of a Saved by the Bell episode though, so that was a good thing, being that I enjoyed Saved by the Bell a great deal when I was younger.

If you have no clue what Bonsai Barber is about, the trailer below should give you a brief glimpse at the game and what you can expect from it:

Seeing Bonsai Barber with an average of over 12 hours “Per person” I think is pretty great for a $10 WiiWare title, and I think the average hours “Per person” make it a cut above the rest, or at least most other WiiWare titles. It seems to me that this game might be a good choice for a portable version on the 3DS, based on the average time per day/session being about half an hour. Perhaps something like what happened with the WiiWare title Fluidity, and its recently announced 3DS version?

Questions
If you have played Bonsai Barber, is it a WiiWare game you would recommend to other Wii owners? Do you know how many hours you played the game, perhaps before setting it aside and not picking it up again?

Do any of you practice bonsai in real life?

If you are interested in Bonsai Barber, you can purchase the game the game from the Wii’s Shop Channel using a Wii Points card or a credit card. If you are interested in bonsai in real life, you might find the book and plant below helpful in getting started:

Is it worth 150 Club Nintendo coins? Fluidity Hours Report

August 15, 2012


Coffee Beans
     Fluidity was released through the WiiWare service on December 6, 2010 at a $12 price point. The game was developed by Curve Studios and published by Nintendo, and it received an ESRB rating of “Everyone” with “Comic Mischief” being the only content listed for gamers and parents to be aware of.

     If you are a Club Nintendo member, you can get Fluidity right now through August 19th, for only 150 coins. You might be wondering though, “Is Fluidity worth 150 Club Nintendo coins, and how many hours can I expect to get from the game?”
     Well, brew yourself a fresh pot of coffee (mine just finished!), and let’s take a look at how many hours U.S. Wii owners have reported playing Fluidity since the game released!

The Brew
     Fluidity now has approximately 20,344 U.S. Wii owners that have reported game-play data using the Nintendo Channel, with 616 days possibly reported.
     The game has an average play-time per day/session of 1 Hour 17 Minutes, and its overall reported average is 11 Hours 5 Minutes “Per person” as the image above shows.

     If you’re wondering about review scores for the game, Fluidity’s “professional” critic review score average is 85.54%, based on 13 reviews on GameRankings.com.
     Based on just the approximate number of players having reported data and Fluidity’s $12 price point, the game has now made about $244,128 off its U.S. release. You can see how much the initial data report showed the game had made in just 64 days after it released, HERE.

Caffeinated Thoughts
     Do I think Fluidity is worth the 150 Club Nintendo coins, or even its regular 1,200 Wii Points asking price? Based on the reported data and my time with just the demo for the game, absolutely! I actually just redeemed 150 of my Club Nintendo coins for the game, and will be downloading it in just a bit.
     If you have not seen anything on Fluidity, here is a trailer to give you an idea of what you can expect from the game:

     If you are perhaps now interested, but still not sure if you should redeem your Club Nintendo coins or even just purchase the game, I believe you can still download the demo for Fluidity from the Wii’s Shop Channel.
     As for the reported hours, the average hours “Per person” for the game are really good, even better than some Wii retail titles I have reported on over the years. Seeing the game have such a high average makes me wonder if perhaps there is a sequel in the works for it, that might be coming to the Wii U? Hopefully, with Nintendo giving Fluidity away for free right now through the Club Nintendo offer, more word-of-mouth can spread about the game and perhaps get more Wii owners to take a look at it.

     If you are a Club Nintendo member and have 150 coins on your account, remember that you have until August 19th, this Sunday, to redeem your coins for the game. If you are not familiar with Club Nintendo and how it works, visit https://club.nintendo.com/ to learn more and set up a free account and start earning coins to get free games and rewards. If you have several Nintendo Wii games that you purchased new just sitting around your house, you should be able to quickly earn enough Club Nintendo coins to get Fluidity before the offer expires on it.

Questions
     Have any of you played and beaten Fluidity? If so, do you remember how many hours it took you to finish the game, and is it a game you would recommend to other Wii owners that might miss out on this Club Nintendo offer, but can still purchase it?
     If you are a Club Nintendo member, have you used any coins to add Fluidity to your WiiWare games collection this month?

What do you get when you search Amazon.com for Fluidity?

Charming? Suave? Awesome? Strong Bad’s Cool Game for Really Attractive People Episode 1: Homestar Ruiner Hours Report

August 5, 2012



Coffee Beans
     Strong Bad’s Cool Game for Really Attractive People Episode 1: Homestar Ruiner was released on August 11, 2008 for the Wii through the WiiWare service at a price point of 1,000 Wii Points, which is $10. The game was developed and published by Telltale Games, and received an ESRB rating of “Teen” with “Crude Humor, Mild Cartoon Violence, Mild Suggestive Themes” being listed for gamers and parents to be aware of.

     How many hours have U.S. Wii owners reported playing one of the longest titled WiiWare games released for the service? If you’re a PC gamer, or a PS3 owner, how many hours can you expect from the first game in the series according to the Wii’s data? Brew yourself some coffee, and let’s take a look!

The Brew
     Strong Bad’s Episode 1: Homestar Ruiner has approximately 32,604 U.S. Wii owners that have reported game-play data through the Nintendo Channel, and the average play-time per day/session is 1 Hour 2 Minutes.
     The game has a “professional” critic review score average of 76.76%, based on 25 reviews GameRankings.com. Like most other WiiWare titles though, there’s no great location to find customer review scores for just the WiiWare release.
     The Nintendo Channel does provide some player feedback though with a “What people are saying…” section. When asked, “To whom does this title most appeal?”, the answer “Everyone” has been chosen by 75% of respondents with the remaining 25% voting “Gamers” as their choice. The second question “What gaming mood best suits this title?” has 83% that selected “Casual” and the remaining 17% selecting “Hardcore”. The final question, “Is this title more fun alone or with friends?” had 73% of voters respond with “Alone” and the remaining 27% voting for “With Friends”.

     How much has the game made for Telltale Games since it released though? According to the reported data for U.S. Wii owners, it has made about $326,040 for Telltale Games since it released based on just the number of players that have reported data and the game’s $10 price point.

Caffeinated Thoughts
     I have not played Strong Bad’s Episode 1: Homestar Ruiner, or any of the games from the series actually. As a matter of fact, I have never played any of Telltales’ games that I am aware of, but before we get there take a look at a trailer for Strong Bad’s Episode 1: Homestar Ruiner:

     All 5 episodes of Strong Bad’s Cool Game for Attractive People can still be purchased on the Wii’s Shop Channel for 1,000 Wii Points each, which is $50 for all the games. If you have a PC or Mac though you can purchase the full series on Steam for just $29.99, or if you shop around you might be able to find the full retail PC version for just $19.99.
     What about PlayStation 3 owners? From what I can tell PS3 owners get the best deal on the games, because they can get all five episodes for just $15. If each game in the series averages 6 hours of game-play like Episode 1 on the Wii does, this would mean PS3 owners could be looking at a solid 30 hours of game-play for only $15, which I think is really great and an even better buy if you’re a fan of the web series.

     I remember watching the trailer above when Episode 1 was releasing for the WiiWare service, but I haven’t really followed the Strong Bad series. That being said, Telltale Games’ newest episodic game series which they have already released two games for and are currently developing three more for, The Walking Dead, has me very interested. A friend is playing through the PlayStation 3 games, and the last I talked with him he was really enjoying them. He is a fan of the television series by the same name, The Walking Dead, and he thought that was one big reason he was enjoying the games so much. I ended up watching the first season after his comments, and I thought it was well done for what it was, enough so that I checked to see if there was a Season 2 available on Netflix. Unfortunately, there wasn’t.

Questions
     Have any of you perhaps played the entire Strong Bad’s Cool Game for Attractive People game series? If so, did you play the Wii, PC, Mac, and/or PlayStation 3 version and do you remember about how many hours it took you to complete the full series? If you don’t remember the total hours, do you perhaps remember if Episode 1 is the longest as of game-play hours?


     If you have started playing The Walking Dead game series from Telltale Games and you have enjoyed the television series as well, would you recommend the games to fans of the television show? Also, do you know about how many hours Episode 1 and Episode 2 take to finish?


Here are a few items related to this post in some way that you may be interested in:

Jump! Run! Kick! Slide! BIT.TRIP RUNNER Hours Report.

July 12, 2012

Coffee Beans
     BIT.TRIP RUNNER released on May 17, 2010 for the Wii, through the WiiWare service. The game was developed by Gaijin Games and published by Aksys Games. It received an ESRB rating of “Everyone” with no content listed for gamers or parents to be aware of, and released at a price point of 800 Wii Points, which is $8.

     How many total hours have U.S. Wii owners spent running, jumping, kicking, and sliding their way through the 2D Bit world with CommanderVideo? Does Bit.Trip Runner offer enough hours of game-play to justify its WiiWare asking price of $8? Brew yourself some coffee, and let’s take a look!

Download a free demo for Bit.Trip Runner on your Wii console, through the Shop Channel.

The Brew
     BIT.TRIP RUNNER has approximately 12,040 U.S. Wii owners that have reported data through the Nintendo Channel, with 784 days possibly reported. Wii owners are averaging just under an hour each time they sit down to play the game, with the average play-time per day/session being 46 Minutes.
     The game has a “professional” review score average of 76.07%, based on 15 reviews on GameRankings.comWhile I wasn’t able to find a list of individual customer reviews, I was able to find a few “overall” customer scores for Bit.Trip Runner and how many “recommend” it on Steam.
     Bit.Trip Runner’s PC version on Steam has 12,928 players that would recommend it to others, and the Wii version has a “User Score” of 8.3 out of 10, on MetaCritic.com.

     How much has Bit.Trip Runner’s WiiWare release made for Gaijin and Aksys? The U.S. WiiWare release has made about $96,320 for the developer and publisher over the last 2 years, before any state/federal taxes or profit sharing with Nintendo, based on the number of players that have reported data and the game’s $8 price point.

Caffeinated Thoughts
     I have been playing the WiiWare demo of Bit.Trip Runner a good bit (ha!) over the last month. If you have never seen any game-play footage of Bit.Trip Runner, below is a video me playing through the first level, “First Contact”, and the first “Retro Challenge” level as well:

     Because the demo of the game plays so well and I have really enjoyed my time with it, I have added Bit.Trip Complete to my “wish list” of Wii games.
     What is Bit.Trip Complete? If you don’t know, according to the description on Amazon.com it has “All 6 BIT.TRIP games with new difficulty levels” on a physical game disc, so it’s not just digital copies. Complete has a list price of $39.99 on Amazon.com, whereas GameStop.com has its price as just $19.99.
     I own another WiiWare version of one of the Bit.Trip games, but haven’t played it very much and never completed it, which is why I’m surprised I have been playing and enjoying this one so much, if only in demo form.
     Based on the reported game-play hours, do I think Bit.Trip Runner is worth the $8 asking price for it on the WiiWare service? Absolutely! $8 for a game averaging 9 Hours, 2 Minutes, I think is a great deal. Considering Bit.Trip Complete has five additional games as well, I would say Bit.Trip Complete is probably a steal at $19.99 from GameStop.

Questions
     Have any of you played and beaten Bit.Trip Runner? If so, is it a game you would recommend to other gamers?
      If you own Bit.Trip Complete, and/or have completed other games in the series, do you have one Bit.Trip game that you favor more than the others?


If any of you are interested in Bit.Trip Runner, you can still download the game from the Wii’s Shop Channel for $8, get the PC version on Steam for $9.99, or get it in the Bit.Trip Complete set which is linked below to Amazon.com and GameStop.com:
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How to survive Lord Vensor the 3rd in Challenge Mode? Rage of the Gladiator Battle!

July 3, 2012
Can you survive all his magic acts?

Coffee Beans
     Magicians never reveal their secrets? Well, at least according to Lord Vensor the 3rd. Over the last 2 years, I have uploaded several boss battle videos from Rage of the Gladiator, and just last month a comment popped up on one of my older videos.
     What was the comment? It was a request asking if I would upload a video of a battle against Lord Vensor the 3rd. For clarification on the question, I asked “From the ‘Challenge Mode’ or the first time you face him?”, and Challenge Mode was the battle they were looking for. I checked some of my older video files from the game, and while I had a Lord Vensor the 3rd battle recorded, it was from the normal mode.
     I fired up Rage of the Gladiator a few nights ago, and decided to pay Lord Vensor the 3rd another visit in the arena, and check out his assortment of illusions. How did the battle go, watch the video below for a full Lord Vensor the 3rd Challenge Mode battle to find out!

     Are there any hints, or tips, I have to help you survive Lord Vensor the 3rd’s assortment of illusions in Challenge Mode, perhaps a little more easily? Brew yourself some coffee, and read the hint/tip I have below with an image, that should give you help for learning how to more easily avoid his “magical” laser show.

     WARNING, the hints/tips I provide are all game-play based, and not Skill Tree based, so if you want to learn how to detect his laser attacks from trial and error and playing against him repeatedly, you might want to skip this section.

The Brew
     Lord Vensor the 3rd has many different “tricks” in his arsenal, as any practicing magician should. Lord Vensor’s tricks though, as colorful as some are, can be really difficult to figure out if you aren’t a practicing magician; or if you don’t feel like getting pummeled by him repeatedly.

     The first magic trick that can be challenging, and probably requires you to pay attention the most, is Lord Vensor’s colorful magical laser sphere attack. He will make a red, green, and blue sphere appear, and then the spheres discharge a laser show. Each sphere can shoot out a red, blue, or green laser, which is damaging and DEADLY if you get hit by enough of them. So, how do you avoid the lasers, and how do you know which ones are coming next? Click the image below to see the strategy:

     As the image above shows/states, the key to surviving Lord Vensor’s laser attack is to start off by dodging. Throughout the entire battle in Challenge Mode, Lord Vensor has meteors raining down from the left and right, which can hurt you. The key with the meteors during the laser show attack is to try and be aware of which side a meteor is falling, and dodge to the opposite side.
     Also, it is very important to note the color of the first laser attack. The color of the first laser attack will provide you with the only clue as to what your next defensive move should be, whether that is dodging, blocking, or jumping.

     I don’t want to spoil too much of the battle for you, but if you have any questions about which colored lasers require which defensive counter, or any other questions, feel free to email me at Scott(@)CoffeeWithGames.com.
     If you have not played Rage of the Gladiator, but are perhaps interested in it, you can download a free demo of the game through the Nintendo Shop Channel.

Questions
     If you own Rage of the Gladiator, how far have you made it in the game, and were you able to obtain the best “Rank” in each battle?
     If you own Rage of the Gladiator, but have not completed the Challenge Mode, is it because you got stuck on a boss battle? If so, which one?

MarioCare, or ObamaCare? Dr. Mario Online Rx’s Reported Hours

June 29, 2012

Coffee Beans
     Politics. Love the topic, hate the topic? Don’t care about it?  Either way, if you have heard any news from outside of the video game world in the last day it probably had the words “Supreme Court”, “ObamaCare”, “Upheld”, or something along those lines in it.
     Dr. Mario Online Rx released on May 26, 2008 on the Wii, through the WiiWare service. The game released with a price point of 1,000 Wii Points, which is $10, and can still be downloaded for that price today. The game was developed by Arika and published by Nintendo. It received an ESRB rating of “Everyone” with no content listed for gamers and parents to be aware of.
     The 2011-2012 flu season has “officially” ended, and with the U.S. Supreme Court upholding ObamaCare, The Patient Protection and Affodable Care Act (PPACA), bill today, I thought now would be a good time to take another look at Dr. Mario Online Rx.
     How many hours have Wii owners reported playing Dr. Mario Online Rx in the last 8 months? Brew yourself some coffee, and let’s take a look!

The Brew
     Dr. Mario Online Rx has approximately 110,402 U.S. Wii owners that have now reported hours through the Nintendo Channel, which is approximately 7,821 more U.S. Wii owners that have reported data for the game since October 24, 2011.
     The game’s average play-time per day/session is 1 Hour 20 Minutes, which is the same as 8 months ago. Dr. Mario’s WiiWare outing has seen an increase of 268,561 Total Hours of game-play reported, over the 2011-2012 influenza season.
     The game has a “professional” review score average of 72.95%, based on 19 reviews on GameRankings.com.

     How much has Dr. Mario Online Rx made Nintendo from its U.S. WiiWare release? Just over the last 8 months, the game has made Nintendo about another $78,210. The total amount for the game is now $1,104,020 just based on the number of U.S. players that have reported data and the game’s $10 price point.

Caffeinated Thoughts
     If you have not see any footage or don’t know much about Dr. Mario Online Rx, the video below gives a good overview of what you should be able to expect from the game:

     As for my questions in the images above, “Vitamins? Government? Which one would you choose?” I would pick vitamins. As for “MarioCare, or ObamaCare?” I would definitely pick MarioCare.
     Politics is great and all, at least if you’re on the money making end of it, but Dr. Mario has already provided great solutions for fighting and defeating viruses for over 20 years now. Would you prefer a vitamin treatment and video game time for a virus as suggested by Dr. Mario, or would you prefer mandated insurance and the IRS as suggested by President Obama? Personally, I would go with vitamins and video games every single time.

Questions
     Have any of you purchased Dr. Mario Online Rx in the last 8 months, and if so, do you know about how many hours you have played the game?
     Keeping it simple, and civil, would you select MarioCare or ObamaCare?

God of War & Punch-Out!! Mixed = Rage of the Gladiator? Arena Hours Debut!

June 21, 2012

Coffee Beans
     What do you get when you mix a mythological game setting like the God of War series has, with game-play from the Punch-Out!! series? Well, I think the results would be Rage of the Gladiator.

     Rage of the Gladiator was released on March 15, 2010 through Nintendo’s WiiWare service, and has a price point of 1,000 Wii Points, which is $10. The game was developed and published by Ghostfire Games, and it received an ESRB rating of “Teen” with “Alcohol Reference, Animated Blood, Violence” listed as content for gamers and parents to be aware of.

     Rage of the Gladiator’s game-play hours just arrived on the Nintendo Channel this week, and how many hours have U.S. Wii owners spent battling bosses in the arena? Brew some coffee, and let’s take a look! Boss battle included!

The Brew
     Rage of the Gladiator has approximately 7,953 U.S. Wii owners that have reported data through the Nintendo Channel for its debut, with 826 days of data possibly reported. The game has an average play-time per day/session of 53 Minutes, with the total average “Per person” being 6 Hours 18 Minutes.
     While WiiWare games are harder to find “user reviews” for because of the digital distribution, the game has a “professional” review score average of 82.08%, based on 19 reviews on GameRankings.com.

     Rage of the Gladiator’s U.S. release has made Ghostfire Games about $79,530 before taxes and profit sharing with Nintendo, just based on the number of players that have reported data and the game’s $10 price point.

Caffeinated Thoughts
     I purchased Rage of the Gladiator the day it released on the WiiWare service, and I have thoroughly enjoyed the game. While the average hours reported show just over 6 hours of game-play, you may be wondering, “How many hours do you have reported Coffee?
     Glad you asked! The image below shows how many hours we have reported for the Coffee House:

     If you’re wondering, you should easily get 10-20 hours of game-play out of the main mode and the game’s Challenge Mode, if you think you are up for the “Challenge”! I think I can definitely say I have gotten my money’s worth out of the game!
     If you don’t know anything/much about Rage of the Gladiator, as I mentioned in the introduction, the game controls a lot like the Punch-Out!! games, which is great in my caffeinated opinion, but with the camera positioned in a first-person perspective.

     The game’s mythological setting though, inspired by games like God of War’s, allowed the developers to get really creative with the bosses in the game, and the types of attacks the bosses use are creative and varying. The game also has “Special Attacks”, sort of like Star Punches in Punch-Out!!, that you can use after unlocking/upgrading them. I thought most of the bosses, their attacks, and the “Special Attacks” in the game were all done really well.
     Here is a video of the first boss battle from the game’s Challenge Mode. I am using the game’s Wii MotionPlus control setting, which allows for the up/down swing attacks you will see:

     If you are perhaps now interested in Rage of the Gladiator, make sure to download the free WiiWare demo for it on the Nintendo Shop Channel. It will allow you to battle the first three bosses in the game’s regular mode, and give you a look at the skill tree as well.

Questions
     Have any of you played and beaten Rage of the Gladiator, even finishing Challenge Mode? If so, did you finish the game with the highest “Best Rank” possible in each battle?
     If you own the game, but have not completed the game’s Challenge Mode, was there a particular boss battle you got stuck on, or reason you didn’t complete it?

If you are interested in Rage of the Gladiator, you can purchase it directly off the Wii’s Shop Channel using a credit card, or by using a Wii Points card as seen below:

Fight the Flu with Dr. Mario? Dr. Mario Online Rx Hours Report

October 30, 2011

Coffee Beans
     Did you know it’s flu season?  If you haven’t seen the “Get Your Flu Shots Here!” signs in your area, they will probably be popping up very soon.  Did you know Mario has a history of battling viruses, even the flu virus, with vitamins?

     Dr. Mario Online Rx was released on May 26, 2008 as a WiiWare title on the Nintendo Wii.  The game released at a price point of 1,000 Wii Points, which is $10.  The game was developed by Arika and published by Nintendo, and received and ESRB rating of “Everyone” with no content listed for parents/gamers to be aware of.
     A portion of the description for Dr. Mario Online Rx reads, “The doctor is in!  Mario takes a break from his adventuring ways and once again dons his stethoscope for a new generation of germ-battling mayhem.  In addition to the classic mode of using vitamins to exterminate viruses, you’ll find two battle modes and an online multiplayer mode where you can hone your skills against players from around the world.”

     So with flu season upon us, how many hours Wii owners have spent battling viruses in Dr. Mario Online Rx?  Let’s take a look!

If you want to enter the Ed Hardy Energy Snacks giveaway, you can do so HERE!

The Brew
     Dr. Mario Online Rx has about 102,581 Wii owners that have reported battling viruses through the Wii’s Nintendo Channel, with 1,246 days possibly reported.
     The game’s average play-time per day/session reported is 1 Hour 20 Minutes.
     Dr. Mario Online Rx’s “professional” review score average is 72.95%, based on 19 reviews on GameRankings.com.  While the game was released world-wide through the WiiWare service, just the United States’ release of Dr. Mario Online Rx has made Nintendo about $1,025,810, just based on the number of players that have reported data and the game’s $10 price point.

Caffeinated Thoughts
     If we compare the average play-time per day/session reported for the game, to that of time spent at a real-life doctor’s appointment with the doctor, I believe Dr. Mario Online Rx comes out as the better choice.
     The real-life time spent with a doctor per visit is said to be between 8-20 minutes, depending on a the type of appointment/visit.  Considering my copay is $30 just for a “primary” doctor’s visit, I would probably be better off paying $10 for Dr. Mario Online Rx and using the other $20 to buy some vitamins to help build my immune system and fight off viruses.  Though I rarely get a flu shot, that may change this year with the two little guys in the house.
     I have not played Dr. Mario Online Rx, or any games from the Dr. Mario series.  Mrs. Coffee though has played one of the games from the series, but she doesn’t remember exactly which one.  When I asked her about it she said, “I just remember the vitamin pills being two different colors, and you had to match up the colors.  I also remember it supposedly played like Tetris, even though I had never played Tetris.”

     As for the reported game-play hours, I think the game’s average hours “Per Person” being 26 Hours 3 Minutes is incredible for a game that only costs $10, and I think it clearly shows that Wii owners really enjoy this game.

Questions
     Have any of you played Dr. Mario Online Rx, and if so, is it a game you still play from time-to-time?  Also, is it a WiiWare game you would recommend to new Wii owners looking for a quality title?
     If you have played games from the Tetris series and the Dr. Mario series, do you favor one of the series more than the other?  Or, does each game series offer enough unique game-play elements to keep them different and fresh from the other?

If any of you are interested in Dr. Mario Online Rx, you can actually purchase an “Online Game Code” for it directly from Amazon.com by clicking the image below!
http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?lt1=_blank&bc1=000000&IS2=1&bg1=FFFFFF&fc1=000000&lc1=0000FF&t=coffeew-20&o=1&p=8&l=as4&m=amazon&f=ifr&ref=ss_til&asins=B003XVYBO4