Archive for the ‘GameCube’ Category

Metroid Prime Trilogy turns 3! How many hours have U.S. Wii owners reported playing it?

August 29, 2012


Coffee Beans
Metroid Prime: Trilogy was released on August 24, 2009 in the U.S. with a MSRP of $49.99. The game was developed by Retro Studios and published by Nintendo, and received an ESRB rating of “Teen” with “Animated Blood, Violence” listed as content for gamers and parents to be aware of. I reported on January 8, 2010, less than 5 months after the game was released, that Nintendo confirmed they were not shipping more copies of Metroid Prime: Trilogy.

How many hours have U.S. Wii players reported playing Metroid Prime: Trilogy since the game released just over 3 years ago? Brew yourself some coffee, and let’s take a look!

The Brew
Metroid Prime: Trilogy now has approximately 86,562 U.S. Wii owners that have reported game-play hours through the Wii’s Nintendo Channel, with 1,099 days possibly reported. The game has about 8,955 more Wii owners now that have reported data, since the report last year.

Trilogy’s play-time per day/session is now 2 hours 13 minutes, and the game’s overall reported average is one hour more than last year, sitting at 34 Hours 13 Minutes as the image shows.

What about the critic and customer review score averages over the last year? The “professional” critic review score average is still 92.27%, based on 33 reviews on GameRankings.com. The customer review score average has changed slightly though, and is now at 96.00% for the game, based on 115 customer reviews on Amazon.com.

Caffeinated Thoughts
I have mentioned before on the site that I purchased my copy of Metroid Prime: Trilogy from Best Buy for just $19.99. I knew the game was a “best buy” at that price, and didn’t pass it up. Looking at the “used” and “new” prices for the game now, I am very glad that I didn’t wait to purchase it, though I have yet to play any of the games on the disc. If you have not seen footage of the Metroid Prime games, and what to expect from them, the trailer below should give you a good idea:

As for the reported data, the overall reported “Total” hours and the average hours “Per person” have increased less than I expected them to over the last year. I thought that perhaps players would completed two of the Metroid Prime games on the disc by now, and that the average would be sitting closer to 40 hours “Per person”. I assume that completing two of the Metroid Prime games should take about 40 hours “Total”, 20 hours for each.

Seeing how much the “new” and “used” prices are for Metroid Prime: Trilogy online, I find it odd that Nintendo hasn’t reprinted the collection. As I said in the recent “Metroid Prime 3: Corruption turns 5!” post, I think Nintendo should at least add Metroid Prime 3: Corruption to the Nintendo Selects games, and if Nintendo doesn’t add Metroid Prime 3: Corruption to the Nintendo Selects lineup, having the Metroid Prime games available to purchase on the Wii U’s eShop when it launches this year I think would be a great alternative, and a great reason to purchase the Wii U day one for fans of the Metroid Prime games.

If you are looking for information on how to enter the games contest/giveaway, you can find that post HERE. If you are already entered in the contest/giveaway, you can get an extra entry by tweeting out this post using the “Tweet” button below and adding @CoffeeWithGames to the tweet; you can also get an extra entry by liking this post on the CoffeeWithGames Facebook page HERE.

Questions
Do you think Nintendo should add Metroid Prime: Trilogy to the Nintendo Selects lineup? If you own Metroid Prime: Trilogy, how many hours have you gotten out of it, and have you completed all three games on it?

See Metroid related Wii games below:

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Analyzing the Wii Manufacturing Costs

August 29, 2009

Analysts like Michael Pachter and others are now more or less singing a chorus that the Wii needs or would benefit from a price drop. While they can analyze that all they want, I just find it interesting how much it may actually be costing Nintendo to manufacture the Wii console.

In December 2006, Engadget.com had an article* that discussed how much the Wii cost to manufacture back then. The article says at one point, “…it seems that Nintendo’s brainchild is only costing $158.30 to manufacture, before you consider the Wiimotes…”.

On the chart they were looking at, there was also a “wholesale price” of $195.99 and their article stated, “ which could be a more realistic figure of how much Nintendo is shelling out when taking external costs (like Reggie flying all over the world) into the equation.”

Fast-forward to April 2009, analyst(oh how we love them), Koya Tabata, is basically quoted that, “manufacturing costs are down a full 45%”, according to a second Engadget article*.

Assuming the Wii console bundle was originally costing Nintendo, $195.99, for everything in the box(minus Wii Sports, as I don’t know if that was included in the wholesale price), and now the manufacturing cost has been reduced by 45%, here’s how much it may be costing to manufacture the Wii console with one Wii remote and nun chuck included:

$195.99 x 45% = $88.1955

$195.99 – $88.20 = $107.79

From the original manufacturing price estimate of $195.99, to the new estimate in manufacturing costs reduction being 45%, I would say Nintendo can manufacture and distribute the Wii, for less than $120. If correct, this would mean a Wii retailing at a MSRP of $149.99 or even $129.99 is possible, but not probable, in the very near future.

How much does it cost Nintendo to manufacture a Wii, including everything in the box, in 2009?

Based on the analyst’s assumption manufacturing costs are down 45% for the Wii, the amount of $107.79 is what it should be costing Nintendo to manufacture a Wii, including everything in the box, currently in 2009.

How much does it cost Nintendo to manufacture JUST the Wii system itself?

$158.30 x 45% = 71.235

$158.30 – 71.24 = $87.06

$87.06 is the amount it should be costing Nintendo to manufacture just the Wii system itself, if the analyst Koya Tabata is correct that manufacturing costs are down 45%.

That may seem like a low cost to manufacture the Wii, but we must remember, the Wii is simply two GameCubes duct taped together*…

Do you think Nintendo is charging too much for the Wii based on these numbers? Or do you think when looking at numbers like these, that an analyst like Michael Pachter may be right in assuming that Nintendo will announce a Wii Plus HD next year and sell it alongside the current Wii?

*http://www.engadget.com/2006/12/15/wii-manufacturing-costs-ring-up-to-just-158/

*http://www.engadget.com/2009/04/07/analyst-suspects-wii-manufacturing-costs-are-down-45/

*http://www.gonintendo.com/viewstory.php?id=14251

Analyzing the Wii Manufacturing Costs in 2009

August 29, 2009
Analysts like Michael Pachter and others are now more or less singing a chorus that the Wii needs or would benefit from a price drop. While they can analyze that all they want, I just find it interesting how much it may actually be costing Nintendo to manufacture the Wii console.
In December 2006, Engadget.com had an article* that discussed how much the Wii cost to manufacture back then. The article says at one point, “…it seems that Nintendo’s brainchild is only costing $158.30 to manufacture, before you consider the Wiimotes…”.
On the chart they were looking at, there was also a “wholesale price” of $195.99 and their article stated, “ which could be a more realistic figure of how much Nintendo is shelling out when taking external costs (like Reggie flying all over the world) into the equation.”
Fast-forward to April 2009, analyst(oh how we love them), Koya Tabata, is basically quoted that, “manufacturing costs are down a full 45%”, according to a second Engadget article*.
Assuming the Wii console bundle was originally costing Nintendo, $195.99, for everything in the box(minus Wii Sports, as I don’t know if that was included in the wholesale price), and now the manufacturing cost has been reduced by 45%, here’s how much it may be costing to manufacture the Wii console with one Wii remote and nun chuck included:
$195.99 x 45% = $88.1955
$195.99 – $88.20 = $107.79
From the original manufacturing price estimate of $195.99, to the new estimate in manufacturing costs reduction being 45%, I would say Nintendo can manufacture and distribute the Wii, for less than $120. If correct, this would mean a Wii retailing at a MSRP of $149.99 or even $129.99 is possible, but not probable, in the very near future.
How much does it cost Nintendo to manufacture a Wii, including everything in the box, in 2009?
Based on the analyst’s assumption manufacturing costs are down 45% for the Wii, the amount of $107.79 is what it should be costing Nintendo to manufacture a Wii, including everything in the box, currently in 2009.
How much does it cost Nintendo to manufacture JUST the Wii system itself?
$158.30 x 45% = 71.235
$158.30 – 71.24 = $87.06
$87.06 is the amount it should be costing Nintendo to manufacture just the Wii system itself, if the analyst Koya Tabata is correct that manufacturing costs are down 45%.
That may seem like a low cost to manufacture the Wii, but we must remember, the Wii is simply two GameCubes duct taped together*…
Do you think Nintendo is charging too much for the Wii based on these numbers? Or do you think when looking at numbers like these, that an analyst like Michael Pachter may be right in assuming that Nintendo will announce a Wii Plus HD next year and sell it alongside the current Wii?